accident and injury attorneys

How to Keep Your Legal Assistant Happy, Part 3

This is the final post in our short series on fostering great relations with your Legal Assistant. Again, we will be incorporating more information into the Dwyer Williams Dretke PC blog to help make it a great resource for new and prospective personal injury lawyers, so check back soon for more professional development posts!

“How to keep your legal secretary happy, part 1” suggested that you provide them with:

  • All incoming mail
  • Concise directions, and
  • Clear project parameters

“How to keep your legal secretary happy, part 2” suggested that you also provide:

  • An open-door policy for asking questions
  • Lists of what they can anticipate to happen on each case if/ when attorneys are out of the office
  • Streamlined phone call protocol

Three Final Ways to Keep Your Legal Assistant Happy

Here are the final three suggestions that our support staff have provided for how we can keep them happier in the workplace, which we want to share with you:

  1. Attorney Whereabouts
    According to our support staff, having this information on hand at all times is essential! The legal assistants are in large part expected to handle a majority of the clients and contact people including but not limited to insurance company representatives, court officials, medical providers, and other attorneys.  It is very difficult to manage these relationships when one is uninformed about attorneys’ locations and expected time back in the office. As with many of our other suggestions, adequate and clear communication with your legal assistant is key here.
  2. True, Uninterrupted Breaks During the Day
    Even if support staff remain in the office for lunch and other breaks, their personal time should be respected and not interrupted unless such interruption is for a true emergency.
  3. T/C’s and Files
    At the time of this poll, we all agreed that it would be a very good idea if the attorneys were given client/ matter files before taking phone calls.  This way, attorneys won’t be talking off of the tops of their heads about case facts, court procedure, or anything else. With files in hand, the attorneys can avoid undue and burdensome work down the road that could easily have been avoided.

We hope that you have gotten something out of this series. Again, we will be sharing more advice like this in the future on our blog as well as on our social media channels.  Subscribe to our RSS feed to get blog posts emailed directly to your inbox, or check us out online on Google+, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Happy Monday and have a great week!

How to Keep Your Legal Assistant Happy, Part 2

Last week we announced that we will be incorporating more information into the Dwyer Williams Dretke PC blog to help make it a great resource for new and prospective personal injury lawyers.

Our first such blog series is about fostering great relations with your Legal Assistant, and our first post in this series suggested that you start to “keep your legal secretary happy” by providing them with:

  • All Incoming Mail
  • Concise Directions, and
  • Clear Project Parameters

Three More Ways to Keep Your Legal Assistant Happy

We polled the legal secretaries in our office and came up a list of nine top areas in which we personal injury lawyers can help empower our assistants and keep them happy in the office.  Here are the fourth through sixth agreed-upon suggestions:

  1. An Open-Door Policy
    Our legal assistants agreed that they would collectively appreciate a more open-door policy for asking questions of their attorneys.  Our support staff felt that some attorneys, who make it clear that they do not appreciate interruption, create a chilling effect on their support staff asking questions.  Legal Assistants need to be able to ask questions of their attorneys without fear of chastisement or reprisal.
  2. Attorney Lists
    If attorneys are out of the office for an extended period of time (3 or more work days), support staff suggested that it would be very helpful for attorneys to provide them with lists of what they anticipate to happen on any given case during their absence.  Statements as simple as “Smith case – waiting for Answer to Complain before sending out Request for Production” or “Black case – waiting for phone call from Dr. Joe before deciding to take the case” would provide Legal Secretaries with a status awaiting their attorneys’ return.  It was also unanimously agreed that it would be helpful for attorneys to leave lists of what they expect their Secretairs to do on any given case or matter while the attorney is out of the office.
  3. Phone Calls
    When asking Legal Assistants to make phone calls for you, our support staff suggests that you develop and utilize some sort of tracking system for streamlining what can otherwise become a time-consuming and frustrating task.  Your assistant needs to know Who to call, When to call them, and What the call is about.

Check back later this week to read our final post in this series.  Remember, also, thatwe will be sharing more advice like this in the future.  From our office to yours!

Client With Preexisting Back Injury Recovers Auto Accident Settlement

Our client in this matter was a passenger in a car being driven by her husband. Their car was stopped at a traffic signal, five cars back from the light. When the light turned green, our client’s husband began to move forward with traffic. As he looked in his rear-view mirror, however, he saw another motorist approaching at a very high rate of speed. That motorist rear-ended our client’s vehicle.

Oregon Back Pain Injury AttorneysPrior to this accident, our client suffered from age-related degeneration in her spine. She was receiving treatment for this degeneration when the accident occurred. We knew that we would need to provide documentation of her back condition because, often and in this case, insurance companies will attempt to blame preexisting conditions for accident victims’ injuries rather than accepting responsibility on behalf of their insureds.

In addition to ordering our client’s accident-related medical records, we ordered prior records in order to determine exactly what condition her spine was in leading up to this traumatic collision. It was very clear based on those records that the accident exacerbated our client’s preexisting back condition.

We provided the at-fault driver’s insurance company with our client’s complete medical records and, after several rounds of negotiation, the case settled for the amount we had previously determined to be the top value for our client’s case. Our client and her husband were happy with the results.

Oregon Nursing Home Residents’ Bill of Rights

The state of Oregon has a Bill of Rights guaranteeing nursing home residents certain protections including the right to be treated with respect and dignity, the right for one’s records to be kept confidential, and freedom from mental and physical abuse as well as from being given unnecessary medication. Nursing home residents cannot be transferred or discharged without good cause, advance notice, or a discharge or transfer plan, and residents have a right to a hearing in order to stop any proposed change. Other rights guaranteed to nursing home residents include:

  • The right to be fully informed of the faculties, policies, and procedures that govern the conduct and responsibilities of all residents
  • The opportunity to participate in the planning of one’s medical treatment
  • No requirement that they perform services for non-therapeutic reasons
  • The right to accept or to refuse medication, treatment, or care and to choose their own physician
  • Freedom from retaliation for complaints

Abuse and neglect in Oregon nursing homes is insidious in large part because family members do not discover the abuse until permanent injury or death occurs. If your loved one has been abused or neglected in his or her elder care facility, contact a caring personal injury attorney today. The right attorney will have the ability to develop aggressive discovery methods that prove substandard treatment or abuse is taking place and to build a solid foundation for your case. Call our dedicated elder abuse and nursing home negligence attorneys today for a free consultation at 541-617-0555.

Elder Mistreatment and Nursing Home Abuse

Below are some of the most common kinds of abuse that we come across as elder abuse personal injury lawyers. Mistreatment of nursing home residents by caregivers can involve a number of situations that result in physical, emotional, or financial harm to the elder adult. Abuse and neglect can include any of the types of mistreatment listed below:

  • Abandonment, such as desertion by the person responsible for providing care to a vulnerable adult
  • Failure of the caregiver to provide articulated or expected care and services to the resident, whether intentional or negligent
  • Malnourishment or dehydration
  • Any untreated medical condition
  • A caregiver’s attitude of indifference to the resident’s physical needs
  • Failure to maintain a clean living environment for the resident
  • Financial abuse and exploitation of the resident’s resources including misappropriation of funds and illegal or improper use of the resident’s accounts
  • Infliction of physical pain
  • Over-medication
  • Inappropriate use of chemical or physical restraints
  • Sexual abuse or rape
  • Emotional abuse, such as verbal assaults or threats

These are all egregious forms of abuse and neglect that no loved one should be put through – especially not when he or she is entrusted to the care of a facility whose business is to care for the elderly. If your vulnerable elder loved one has experienced any form of elder abuse or nursing home neglect in Oregon, call us today for a free consultation and to discuss your case at 541-617-0555. We care and we can help. you